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UCLA Graduate Writing Center

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About the Graduate Writing Consultants--Read First

We encourage you to make an appointment with a writing consultant in an academic area similar to yours, so please review the consultant bios listed below. All writing consultants have been trained to help graduate students with general writing issues in any field, but it can be helpful to work with someone in a field more similar to your own.

Foreign languages: a few of our writing consultants feel comfortable reading work in other languages. See bios for more information.

Abraham

Department: English
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Professional Writing, Humanities & Arts, Application Documents, Oral Presentations, Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Style/Flow, Creative Writing, Narrative Writing
Pronouns: he/him
Bio: Abraham is a Ph.D. student in English and is interested in comparative work between 20th century U.S. multi-ethnic literature and Latin American literature. He has two years experience working in the Graduate Writing Center. He can speak, read, and write in academic Spanish fluently and has done work in oral and written translation. He has conducted interviews for oral history projects archived in the UCLA Library. He has taught creative writing classes with a focus on revision strategies. He has written letters of recommendation for students applying to graduate school, internships, jobs, and scholarships. His favorite punctuation mark is one not typically used in academic writing but overused in the comic book genre: the excellent exclamation mark!

Adriana

Department: Psychology
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Fellowships/Grants, STEM, Social Sciences, Application Documents, Article Manuscripts, Quantitative Methods, Statistical Reporting, Statistics, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Writing Process, Style/Flow, Master’s Thesis
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Adriana is a Developmental Psychology PhD student studying the impact of early life adversity on neurodevelopment. Over the course of her graduate career, she has been awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, an NICHD Brain and Behavioral Development during Adolescence (BBDA) T32 Doctoral Training Fellowship, a Eugene V. Cota-Robles Fellowship, a UCLA Graduate Research Mentorship fellowship, and a UCLA Graduate Dean’s Scholar Award. She also received an Honorable Mention for the Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship. Prior to enrolling at UCLA, Adriana graduated from Harvard College with a degree in Neurobiology (Mind, Brain and Behavior) and a minor in Computer Science. Despite her reliance on parentheses (they can be so helpful!), her favorite punctuation mark is the comma.

Aidan

Department: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Writing Specialities:
Academic Writing, Application Documents, Article Manuscripts, Fellowships/Grants, Lab Reports, Quantitative Methods, STEM, Style/Flow, Writing Process
Pronouns: he/him
Bio: Aidan is a PhD student studying evolutionary developmental biology. His research focuses on the rules that govern how variation develops in animals. Aidan earned a BSc in Biology from McGill University, where he studied developmental biology and paleontology. As a graduate student, he has received the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (NSF GRFP). Aidan’s ~favorite~ punctuation mark is the tilde, for its ability to add ~special emphasis~ with its squiggly arms.

Alana

Department: Chicana/o and Central American Studies
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, Social Sciences, Humanities, Qualitative Methods, Oral History, Critical Geography, Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Style/Flow, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Master’s Thesis
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Alana is a PhD candidate in the César E Chávez Department of Chicana/o and Central American Studies. Her research is concerned with histories of displacement, dispossession, diaspora, loss, return, and what these sometimes have to do with rivers, particularly the Río Grande. Her dissertation is a historical study of the Río Grande’s role in land disputes along the Texas-Mexico border. In addition to her training in Chicana/o Studies, Alana holds UCLA graduate certificates in American Indian Studies and Writing Pedagogy. Alana is also a poet whose poetry has been published in Huizache, Duende, The Acentos Review, Kweli Journal, and The Florida Review’s 2018 Latinx special feature issue, among others. Alana is an alum of Hampshire College where she studied Latina/o Studies, creative writing, journalism, and U.S. immigration history. At UCLA, Alana has been a recipient of the Ford Pre-Doctoral Fellowship, the IUPRL/Mellon Fellowship, the Graduate Research Mentorship Fellowship Program, the Graduate Summer Research Mentorship Fellowship Program, the Gold Shield Alumni Scholarship, and grants from the Institute of American Cultures. Her favorite punctuation mark is, of course, the comma.

Amelia

Department: Comparative Literature
Writing Specialties:English Language Learners, Academic Writing, Application Documents, Humanities & Arts, Cultural Studies, Writing Process, Revision, Editing, Grammar/Mechanics, Style/Flow, Master’s Thesis
Pronouns: she/her
Bio:Amelia is a PhD student in Comparative Literature. Her research interests include Memory Studies, Turkish literature and culture, Latin American literature and culture, and interdisciplinary approaches to literary study. She has an MA in Comparative Literature from the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies, where she studied critical theory and Turkish and Arabic literatures (in translation!). Before attending UCLA, Amelia worked as an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) instructor for university students and adult learners in Japan, Turkey, and Colorado. Her favorite punctuation mark is the em dash, because it can get her out of punctuation pickles and because it adds a little extra drama to her writing.

Andrew

Department: Sociology
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, Application Documents, Professional Writing, Social Sciences, Qualitative Methods, Writing Process, Style/Flow
Pronouns: he/him
Bio: Andrew is a PhD student in the Sociology department. He studies social movements, urban governance, and land use and environmental policy. Andrew has an MSc in political sociology from the London School of Economics and a BA from McGill University. His professional background includes teaching English in Iksan, South Korea and providing one-on-one tutoring in English Composition. Before attending UCLA, Andrew worked in arts education, where he produced and edited a professional publication. He is the recipient of a Graduate Research Mentorship Award. His favorite punctuation mark—even though his many asides might indicate otherwise—is the period.

Brande

Department: Urban Schooling
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Application Documents, Professional Writing, Report Writing, Critical Race Theory, Cultural Studies, Oral Presentations, Writing Process, Revision Strategies
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Brande is a Ph.D. student in Urban Schooling. She is primarily interested in social stratification in schools, disability, and anti-blackness in special education policy. She earned her B.A. in Psychology and Social Behavior from the University of California, Irvine. Brande then spent time traveling across the United States before settling back in her hometown in Southern California. She pursued an M.A. and Ed.S. degree in Counseling and Educational Psychology and worked in Long Beach Unified School District as a School Psychologist. There, she learned about psychoeducational report writing, academic writing, and professional writing. She is a recent recipient of the Graduate Summer Research Mentorship award. Her personal interests include meditation, road trippin’, and rock climbing. Her favorite punctuation mark is the period. Period.

Caroline

Department: Psychology
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, STEM, Social Sciences, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Article Manuscripts, Oral Presentations, Public Speaking, Quantitative Methods, Statistical Reporting, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Style/Flow, Master’s Thesis
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Caroline is a doctoral student in Clinical Psychology. After graduating from Yale University with a BS in Psychology, she worked as a clinical research coordinator conducting community mental health research in Philadelphia before moving to LA for graduate school. Currently, her research focuses on identifying neural correlates of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia, as well as neural mechanisms of cognitive recovery following intervention. She is a recipient of the NIH National Research Service Award (F31) and the UCLA Graduate Research Mentorship, Graduate Summer Research Mentorship, and Faculty Women’s Club Scholarship. Outside of her graduate studies, she enjoys singing, baking, and hiking. Her favorite punctuation mark is the exclamation point, which conveys a zest for life!

Dominique

Department: Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, STEM, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Oral Presentations, Public Speaking, Quantitative Methods, Lab Reports
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Dominique is a PhD student in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences researching radiation belt dynamics. She uses a machine learning approach to establish a relationship between high and low orbit electron flux data to better predict space weather. Dominique earned her BS from UCLA in astrophysics and conducted undergraduate research in the EPSS department. Her work in undergrad was focused on planetary sedimentology, specifically dune formation on Mars. Before starting graduate school, Dominique worked for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the Atmospheric Physics and Weather Group. Beyond research, Dominique enjoys crocheting blankets, hanging out with her 6 lb poodle, and cooking. Her favorite punctuation mark is the comma, especially the oxford comma!

Drew

Department: Comparative Literature
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, Non-Academic Writing, Legal Writing, Professional Writing, Application Documents, Critical Race Theory, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Cultural Studies, Humanities & Arts, Oral Presentations, Article Manuscript, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Grammar/Mechanics, Style/Flow, Creative Writing, Narrative Writing, Master’s Thesis, English Language Learners
Pronouns: he/him
Bio: Drew is a PhD student in Comparative Literature. His research focuses on philosophy, critical theory, literary & film theory, and digital media studies. He received his BA in Philosophy and English from UCLA in 2009 before going on to obtain his MA in Humanities (with an emphasis in Continental Philosophy) from the University of Chicago in 2011. Before returning to UCLA, he acquired his JD from the University of California Hastings College of the Law, where he worked as a tutor and a Senior Supervising Editor for UC Hasting’s Constitutional Law Quarterly. He currently serves on the editorial board for Press Start, an academic journal of video games studies. His favorite punctuation mark is the § (‘section sign’) because of the §ylistic §ophistication it lends to the organization of one’s writing.

Ebony

Department: Gender Studies
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, Application Documents, Writing Process, Humanities, Qualitative Methods, Style/Flow, Cultural Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Black Studies.
Pronouns: they/them, she/her
Bio: Ebony is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Gender Studies. Their research is concerned with technologies of gender, and broadly includes interests in Black feminisms, fat studies, leisure studies, performance studies, disability studies, and Black studies. They received their BA in Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon in 2012 before obtaining their MA in Educational Leadership and Policy from Portland State University in 2018. At UCLA, Ebony is a recipient of the Graduate Summer Research Mentorship Fellowship Program and is a Eugene V. Cota Robles Fellow. Outside of graduate school, Ebony enjoys experimenting with art and fashion. Her favorite punctuation mark is the colon.

Jackie

Department: World Arts and Cultures/Dance
Writing Specialties:Humanities & Arts, Academic Writing, Fellowships/Grants, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Cultural Studies, Non-academic Writing, Writing Process, Style/Flow, Application Documents, Oral presentations, Revision Strategies
Pronouns: she/her
Bio:Jackie is a Ph.D. candidate in the World Arts and Cultures/Dance department. Her research focuses on avant-garde German/Jewish modern dancer Valeska Gert (1892-1978), her performance spaces both in Germany and the United States, and the forms of sociality (and non-sociality) that she cultivated through her artistic practices. Overall, Jackie’s research evaluates dance and the production of subversive body politics. Jackie has received extramural awards from the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD), Leo Baeck Institute, and the University for Music and Dance Cologne. She was also awarded intramural fellowships from UCLA's Graduate Division (GSRM and Graduate Dean’s Scholar Award), the Center for the Study of Women, the Center for European and Russian Studies, Leve Center, and Luskin Institute on Inequality and Democracy. Jackie had a previous life as an experimental filmmaker and visual artist. Her work has been screened internationally and she has published a number of artist books. Jackie holds B.A. degrees in Dance and History as well as an M.A. in Culture and Performance. Her favorite punctuation mark is the period because she values momentary completion.

Jeanette

Department: History
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Application Documents, Humanities, Oral Presentations, Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Style/Flow, Master’s Thesis
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Jeanette is a graduate student in the History department specializing in the Atlantic World. Her research interests focus on African Diasporic resistance and popular movements in the Americas. After earning her BA in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Scripps College, Jeanette has worked as a solidarity activist and journalist across the region for almost a decade accompanying African and Indigenous led grassroots struggles. During her time in Venezuela, she pursued graduate studies at the Bolivarian University of Venezuela (UBV) in Caracas and worked with the Cátedra Libre África, a research center focused on Afro-Venezuelan history and the country’s relationship to Africa and the Caribbean. One of her favorite punctuation marks is the em dash.

Jessica

Department: Political Science
Writing Specialties:Academic Writing, Policy Memos, Writing to a General Audience, Professional Writing, Social Sciences, Humanities & Arts, Oral Presentations, Qualitative and Quantitative Methods, Writing Process, Grant Writing.
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Jessica Cobian is a PhD student and Eugene V. Cota-Robles Fellow in the political science department at UCLA. She received an honorable mention from the Ford Predoctoral Fellowship and is a recipient of the APSA Fund for Latino Scholarship, APSA Diversity Fellowship and the UCLA Political Psychology Fellowship. Her research focuses on Latino political behavior, voter turnout, group threat and xenophobia. Prior to attending UCLA, Jessica worked on campaign management and policy analysis on immigration, democracy and technology at the progressive think tank, Center for American Progress in Washington DC. She has previously worked as an immigration campaign manager for Sojourners, a lead organizer for ACCE and a community organizer for Faith in Action in California. She has published at JAMA Network Open, written for Sojourners and the Center for American Progress and has opinion editorials in the Voice of San Diego, Univision, La Prensa and Colorlines. Jessica holds an MPP from American University and a B.A. in political science from UC Riverside.

Jessie

Department: Anthropology
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, Editing/Revision Strategies, Application Documents, Social Sciences, Humanities/Arts, Fellowships/Grants, Article Manuscripts, Oral Presentations, Critical Race Theory, Qualitative Methods, Master’s Thesis, Style/Flow, English Language Learners, Grammar/Mechanics, Writing Process
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Jessie is a Ph.D. student in the department of Anthropology, specializing in sociocultural anthropology. Her research focuses on historic entanglements between Black and Jewish communities in North Africa. Specifically, she examines how different elements within the archival landscape in Morocco resist and construct notions of difference between Black and Jewish Moroccans. She holds a B.A. in Middle Eastern and North African Studies as well as Romance Languages and Literature (Spanish) from the University of Michigan in addition to a M.A. in Anthropology from UCLA. Jessie has worked (and aspires to continue working) in the publishing industry as a content and copy editor as well as a translator (Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, French, and Spanish.) Jessie has received a Fulbright Student Researcher grant, an Andrew Mellon Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship, the GRM, and the GSRM. Parentheses are her favorite punctuation mark(s) because they are so versatile (and look like a whisper on the page!)

Jesslyn

Department: English
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Humanities, Humanities & Arts, Arts, Application Documents, Article Manuscripts, Oral Presentations, Public Speaking, Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Grammar/Mechanics, Style/ flow, Creative Writing, Narrative Writing
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Jesslyn Whittell is a 2nd year Ph.D. student in English. She studies poetics, with a split focus on Romanticism and 21st-century texts. Her research interests include the relationship between computer science and literary form (not digital humanities but algorithmic logic, abstraction, statistics, and data). Her recent projects have engaged works by William Blake, Anna Moschovakis, Douglas Kearney, Morgan Parker, and P.B. Shelley. She earned her B.A. from UC Berkeley in English and Computer Science. Her favorite punctuation mark is the em-dash, especially when it’s used to unsettle a poem's formal conceits.

Kalani

Department: Archaeology
Writing Specialties:
Fellowships/Grants, Academic Writing, Social Sciences, Application Documents, Cultural Studies, Decolonial theory, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies
Pronouns: she/her, they/them
Bio: Kalani is a Ph.D. candidate in Hawaiian archaeology. Her research combines microecofact and isotope analysis with Native Hawaiian ways of knowing to develop an activist archaeology geared towards decolonizing the discipline and fighting for water rights in Maui. She received her B.A. in Integrative Biology and her B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies, a self-designed major combining LGBTQ studies, queer theory, Near Eastern archaeology, and theology, from UC Berkeley. Prior to starting her dissertation, she completed her M.A. thesis at UCLA where she focused on gender and sexuality in Hawaiʻi. She is a Ford Pre-Doctoral Fellow and NSF GRFP recipient. In her free time, she enjoys playing rugby, paddleboarding, and baking. Her favorite punctuation mark is the kahakō (the line above some vowels in Hawaiian) because she is passionate about learning and perpetuating the Hawaiian language. E ola mau ka ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi!

Kimberly

Department: Chicana/o and Central American Studies
Writing Specialties:
Critical Race Theory, Writing Process, Revision strategies, Style/Flow, Article Manuscripts, Social Sciences
Pronouns: they/them
Bio: Kim is a PhD student in Chicana/o and Central American Studies. They are a non-traditional student and received their A.A. in Art History at East Los Angeles Community College and transferred to UCLA where they received their B.A. in Chicana/o Studies and minor in African American Studies. They study race, space, and placemaking in Los Angeles and are specifically interested in housing justice movements and how rent burdened Latinas navigate landlord harassment and state violence when undergoing eviction. Kim is also involved in popular education efforts and facilitating support groups that address restorative justice. Kim is a recipient of the Eugene V. Cota Robles fellowship, the Ford Pre-Doctoral Fellowship, Graduate Research Mentorship fellowship and the Graduate Council Diversity Fellowship. Their favorite punctuation mark is the exclamation mark!

Leezet

Department: Psychology
Writing Specialties: Fellowships/Grants, Academic Writing, Social Sciences, STEM, Statistics, Statistical Reporting, Quantitative Methods, Critical Race Theory, Application Documents, Oral Presentations, Writing Process, Style/Flow, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Master’sThesis
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Leezet is a third-year Psychology PhD student who specializes in social cognitive neuroscience. Her current research investigates how people from dominant and marginalized racial groups understand and experience our racialized social world, using both social neuroscience and computational linguistics approaches. Over the course of graduate career, she has been awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, a UCLA Graduate Research Mentorship fellowship, a UCLA Graduate Summer Research fellowship, a Eugene V. Cota-Robles Fellowship, and a UCLA Alumni Fellowship. Leezet graduated from Princeton University with a BA degree in Neuroscience and a strong background in African American Studies, Critical Race Theory, and Science, Technology, and Society (STS) Studies.
Before pursuing her PhD, she gained experience in machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) development while working as a data scientist for a technology start-up. Her favorite punctuation mark—which she admittedly overuses—is the em dash.

Lika

Department: Comparative Literature
Writing Specialties: Academic writing, Non-academic writing, Application Documents, Humanities & Arts, Fellowships/Grants, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory, Oral presentations, Writing Process, Editing Strategies, Style/Flow, Grammar/mechanics.
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Lika is a PhD student in comparative literature. Her research interests include representations of gender and sexuality and space/environment in 20 th century and contemporary literature and film, French and Francophone literatures, and notions of space, confinement and movement within French and English-language contexts. Most recently she has written about Albert Camus, space, and gender; national allegory and metonymy; and 20 th century re-imaginings of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Lika holds B.A. degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in English and French literature and an M.A. in comparative literature from UCLA. In addition to research and teaching, Lika copyedits for an independent press that publishes work on politics, art, and philosophy and volunteers with small nonprofits on their grant writing efforts. Prior to grad. school she worked as a writer in a behavioral psychology lab, in academic administration and in continuing education. Her favorite punctuation = the ( ) and the …

Marie

Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Application Documents, STEM, Fellowships/Grants, Article Manuscripts, Oral/Conference Presentations, Quantitative Methods, Statistical Reporting, Dissertation, Writing Process, Revision & Editing Strategies
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Marie is a Mechanical Engineering Ph.D. candidate who studies the effects of mechanical and physiological stimulation on 3D stem cell and cancer tissues. She earned her B.S. from Stanford University in Civil & Environmental Engineering and has an abundance of personal experience with writing across disciplines. In addition, Marie is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, has presented her work at national conferences, and has co-authored peer-reviewed research. Outside of graduate work, she enjoys staying active (favorites: ultimate frisbee/tennis/hiking/yoga), eating, and traveling. Parentheses are her favorite punctuation mark(s) since they are great for conveying additional information and feeling.

Marilyn

Graduate Writing Center Director
Pronouns:
she/her
Bio: Marilyn Gray is the director of the UCLA Graduate Writing Center. She has a PhD in Slavic Languages and Literatures from UCLA. Her dissertation examines Mikhail Bakhtin’s thought and narrative theory from the perspective of Russian theological anthropology. After completing her BA in Slavic Languages and Literatures at Stanford University, she lived and worked in Moscow for four years. During her graduate work at UCLA, she worked for the Center for Digital Humanities assisting faculty with instructional technology and taught Russian language and English composition. She is a big fan of the em-dash and semi-colon when used judiciously.

McKenna

Department:Fellowships/Grants, STEM, Academic Writing, Application Documents, Quantitative Methods, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing, Lab Reports, Oral Presentations, Public Speaking, Post-Graduate Opportunities
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: McKenna is a fourth-year PhD candidate in Aerospace Engineering. She develops novel software to improve the performance and lifetime of electrospray thrusters for spacecraft propulsion in partnership with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and multiple Air Force Research Laboratories (AFRLs). Prior to pursuing her PhD, McKenna graduated from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN with Bachelor of Science degrees in Physics and Mathematics and a minor in Business. McKenna is a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellow and has also been awarded the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, a Goldwater Scholarship, a NASA Space Grant, and a Woman in Engineering award. She has authored journal and conference publications and presented her research internationally.

Michael

Department: Political Science
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, Professional Writing , Humanities, Social Sciences, Application Documents, Oral Presentations, Public Speaking, Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Writing Process, Revision, Editing, Grammar/Mechanics, Style/ flow, English Language Learners, Master’s Thesis, Creative Writing, Narrative Writing
Pronouns: he/him
Bio: Michael is a PhD student in political science focusing on political theory. His circuitous academic career has led him to get degrees in English, Philosophy, Education and Gender Studies. He has been tutoring writing since college and enjoys the challenge of reading across disciplines. Beside his academic work, he is a sporadic book reviewer and writer for publications such as Jewish Currents and Public Books. His favorite punctuation mark is the em-dash because of its variety of uses and because it makes long sentences readable.

Paheli

Department: Computational Medicine - Biomathematics
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, STEM, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Writing Process, Revision, Editing
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Paheli is a PhD student in Biomathematics with a focus on mathematical modeling in neuroscience. She earned her BS from UC San Diego in Mathematics/Applied Science, with a concentration in chemistry. In undergrad, she worked in a theoretical physics research group studying neuronal network modeling. At UCLA, she received the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship to fund her work using tools from calculus, physics, and image data analysis to understand the relationship between nerve cell structure and function. Outside of research, she loves writing, drawing, and painting. Her favorite punctuation mark is the semicolon; it creates space for development before the end.

Rob

Department: Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, STEM, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Lab Reports, Public Speaking, Articles/Manuscripts
Pronouns: they/them, he/him
Bio: Rob Ulrich is a Biogeochemistry Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences who researches how living things make their hard parts. More specifically, they are interested in developing and using novel geochemical tracers (e.g., trace elements, “clumped” isotopes) to identify the biomineralization strategies. Beyond graduate school, Rob is also the Associate Director of the Reclaiming STEM Institute, which is hub of inclusive science communication and science policy research and trainings, a Co-Founder of Queer & Trans in STEM (fka Queers in STEM), and a writer. For their research and advocacy, Rob currently holds fellowships with the National Science Foundation and the Center for Diverse Leadership in Science, and they have been invited to speak on the popular podcasts, including Ologies, Talk Nerdy, ExoLore, and at meetings for the American Geophysical Union, the Dr. Lucy Jones Center for Science and Society, the Geologic Society of America, the California Academy of Sciences, and the New York Academy of Sciences. To avoid answering the question “What do you want to do after your Ph.D.?”, they hide in their apartment and cook and bake, or outside by hiking and going to the beach. The em-dash is their favorite punctuation.

Tony

Department: English
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Non-academic writing, Humanities & Arts, Application Documents, Oral Presentations, Public Speaking, Cultural Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Style/Flow, Grammar/Mechanics, Creative Writing
Pronouns: they/them, he/him
Bio: Tony is a 5th year Ph.D student in English who uses both they/them and he/him pronouns. He writes about contemporary comics in terms of labor, race, and disability, and he is especially interested in writing criticism for a public audience. He's a managing editor for the literary journal Nat. Brut, where he was previously a fiction editor. His favorite punctuation mark is the slash, because it's useful for indecisive writers in a hurry.

Zoe

Department: Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, STEM, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Oral Presentations, Public Speaking, Quantitative Methods, Statistical reporting, Lab Reports
Pronouns: she/her
Bio: Zoe is a PhD student in the AOS department researching vegetation remote sensing. More specifically, she uses ground-based and satellite measurements to understand plant productivity and carbon uptake in a changing climate. Zoe received her BA in Physics with an Environmental Science concentration and a Chemistry minor from Colorado College. Her undergraduate research was in solar and space physics where she focused on understanding the hydrogen concentration of the exosphere. Zoe is a recipient of UCLA’s Eugene V. Cota-Robles Fellowship, the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (NSF GRFP), and the Future Investigators in NASA Earth and Space Science and Technology (FINESST) fellowship. In her free time, Zoe enjoys snuggling with her cat Nova, doing yoga, and running around outside. Her favorite punctuation is the tilde because it can formally tell you the experiment takes approximately 30 minutes to run (~30min) or it can just convey a ~~~vibe~~~. Zoe also loves the exclamation point, but she has a tendency to use it too much when writing emails!!

Support for Fellowships and Grants

The GWC is not currently offering fellowship drop-in hours, but we are offering a full schedule of regular appointments. If you would like to know which consultants have received a particular workshop, please read the consultant bios.

If you have any questions about fellowship support, please email gwc@gsa.asucla.ucla.edu.

For more information about GWC fellowship support, go to: https://gwc.gsrc.ucla.edu/fellowship-support

Activating Your Handshake Account

Every UCLA student already has a Handshake account. To activate your account, go to ucla.joinhandshake.com and click the blue button labeled “University of California, Los Angeles Sign On”.

From there, you'll be taken to the UCLA Sign-in page, where you should enter your UCLA Login ID and password.

If you are signing in to Handshake for the first time, you'll be prompted to activate your account. At this screen, you will also be able to choose whether you'd like your Handshake profile to be public.

Note that you do not need to make your profile public in order to make an appointment at the Graduate Writing Center.

Once you activate, you'll be prompted to fill out your profile. If your profile is empty, you may see a message like this:

Again, this step is not necessary in order to make an appointment. You can simply close the window and go directly to the appointment system. (You can always modify your profile at a later date if you'd like.)

For additional help, visit the Handshake Help Center.

Using Handshake to Make a Graduate Writing Center Appointment

Once you are logged in to Handshake, go to the “Career Center” menu at the top of the page. In that menu, you will see an “Appointments” option. Click that to make an appointment with a Graduate Writing Consultant. (You can also make appointments here with Career Center staff.)

You'll then be taken to the Appointments page, which will have a link to make a new appointment, as well as show any upcoming and previous appointments.

If you click the "Schedule a New Appointment" link, you'll be taken to a screen where you will choose the type of appointment you would like. Because Handshake is also used by the Career Center, you may see additional options, such as career advising appointments. To make a writing appointment, however, click on "Graduate Writing Appointments."

Once you select the type of appointment, you'll be taken to a screen showing the dates and times available. Choose your preferred date, and then click on the appointment you'd like to take.

After signing up for your appointment, you will be asked to respond to some questions about yourself and your project. You will also be asked to specify your preferred appointment medium (Face-to-Face or Skype). If you choose a Skype appointment, please see our Skype instructions here. Please remember to bring two copies of your project to the appointment (or, if meeting remotely, e-mail the file to gwc@gsa.asucla.ucla.edu.)

Appointment Medium

In-Person Appointments

We are offering limited in-person appointments. In Fall 2022, in-person options are Mondays, 12-3 PM; Tuesday; 1:30-5:30PM, Wednesdays, 1:30-5:30 PM, Thursdays, 1:30-6 PM, and Fridays, 8:30-11:30 AM. Please contact gwc@gsa.asucla.ucla.edu if you have any questions.

Skype Appointments (our default)

Remote Appointments via Audio Skype.
Our primary medium is Audio Skype. If you need a chat-based or video-based Skype appointment for accessibility or other reasons, please contact us at gwc@gsa.asucla.ucla.edu at least 2 business days before your appointment and describe your request in the email (please put "Skype medium request" in the email subject line). We will do our best to accommodate you, but some consultants may not offer alternative Skype medums.

For Skype appointments, please use the instructions below:

  • Install the free Skype software on your computer if it is not already installed. Follow the instructions to create a username and password. Perform a test call to make sure your sound functions. We use Skype audio (not video) during the 50-minute appointment.
  • Login to Skype.
  • If your appointment starts on the hour, communicate with the Skype account uclagwc;
    if your appointment starts on the half hour, communicate with Skype account uclagwc2;
    if your appointment starts on the quarter hour, communicate with Skype account live:.cid.511156d022b96bc0 or alternatively "UCLA Graduate Writing Center 3" (display name)
  • Send your paper via Skype chat to the appropriate account at the start of the appointment.
  • Have a copy of your writing project in front of you.
  • Your consultant will call you at the scheduled time.
  • We expect that you will be available to discuss your paper and give your full attention to the appointment during the scheduled time.

Back-up scenarios:

  • If you are having trouble installing the Skype application, the consultant may be able to initiate a web-based Skype session with you. Please contact our email if that is your situation (gwc@gsa.asucla.ucla.edu).
  • As a back-up form of communication, you may send your paper in an email to gwc@gsa.asucla.ucla.edu with three components: 1) put "Skype appointment" and the appointment time in the subject line; 2) attach the writing project that you want to discuss to the email; 3) tell us your Skype username in the body of the email (you should also enter your Skype name in Handshake when you register). Please keep in mind that the consultant will not review your writing project until the start of the appointment.

Zoom Appointments

We are now offering Zoom as an appointment option if you provide the Zoom link in your registration form. Please be sure to email your project document at gwc@gsa.asucla.ucla.edu at the beginning of the appointment.

Please email the GWC if you have any questions: gwc@gsa.asucla.ucla.edu

Scheduling and Cancellation Policies

Scheduling and cancellation policies: You may schedule one appointment per week (Monday - Friday) in advance. If you must cancel your appointment, please do so by midnight the night before your appointment date. Late cancellations and no-shows will be penalized. There are no exceptions to this policy unless the student can provide valid documentation (e.g., a doctor's note) within 48 hours of the missed appointment.

If you have any questions, Please consult our policies page, e-mail us at gwc@gsa.asucla.ucla.edu, or call (310) 267-4805, between 9am and 5pm on weekdays.