Meet the Graduate Writing Consultants

We strongly encourage you to make an appointment with the writing consultant in the academic area most similar to yours, so please review the consultant bios listed below. All writing consultants have been trained to help graduate students with general writing issues in any field, but it can be helpful to work with someone in a field more similar to your own.

Foreign languages: a few of our writing consultants feel comfortable reading work in other languages. See their bios for more information.

Abraham

Department: English
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Professional Writing, Humanities & Arts, Application Documents, Oral Presentations, Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Style/Flow, Creative Writing, Narrative Writing
Bio:
Abraham is a 5th year Ph.D. student in English and is interested in comparative work between 20th century U.S. multi-ethnic literature and Latin American literature. He can speak, read, and write in academic Spanish fluently and has done work in oral and written translation. He's written letters of reference for students applying to graduate schools, jobs, and scholarships. His favorite punctuation mark is one not typically used in academic writing but overused in the comic book genre: the excellent exclamation mark! Boom!!!

Alex

Department: Medicine
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, Professional Writing, STEM, Medical Writing, Fellowships/Grants, Article Manuscripts, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Grammar/Mechanics, Style/ flow, Master’s Thesis, Dissertation, Lab Reports 
Bio: Alex is a fourth year medical student in the UCLA-Caltech MD-PhD program. His graduate research in organic chemistry focused on reaction development and applications to medicinal chemistry. Prior to UCLA, Alex obtained a BA/MSc in Chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the recipient of an NIH NRSA F30 award and has experience applying and interviewing for various other fellowships such as the Rhodes and Hertz. Outside of the lab, Alex enjoys photography, nature, and the NBA. Like many others, and for good reason, his favorite punctuation mark is the em—dash.

Arielle

Department: English
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, Professional Writing, Humanities, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Oral Presentations, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, English Language Learners 
Bio: Arielle is a fourth-year PhD student in UCLA’s English department. She studies postcolonial literature with a focus on humanitarianism and its limits. She earned her BA in English from Yale University and was also a Writing Partner at the Yale College Writing Center. After graduating from college, she taught English composition courses at the Chinese University of Hong Kong for two years. She has also been a successful applicant for the Fulbright U.S. student program. Her favorite punctuation mark is the em-dash—and she uses far too many of them in her writing.

 

Brande

Department: Urban Schooling
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Application Documents, Professional Writing, Report Writing, Critical Race Theory, Cultural Studies, Oral Presentations, Writing Process, Revision Strategies
Bio: Brande is a second-year Ph.D. student in Urban Schooling. She is primarily interested in social stratification in schools, disability, and anti-blackness in special education policy. She earned her B.A. in Psychology and Social Behavior from the University of California, Irvine. Brande then spent time traveling across the United States before settling back in her hometown in Southern California. She pursued an M.A. and Ed.S. degree in Counseling and Educational Psychology and worked in Long Beach Unified School District as a School Psychologist. There, she learned about psychoeducational report writing, academic writing, and professional writing. She is a recent recipient of the Graduate Summer Research Mentorship award. Her personal interests include meditation, road trippin’, and rock climbing. Her favorite punctuation mark is the period. Period. 

Brandon

Department: Comparative Literature 
Writing Specialties: 
Academic Writing, Application Documents, Humanities & Arts, Oral Presentations, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Grammar/Mechanics, Style/ flow, English Language Learners, Creative Writing, Narrative Writing, Scrivener
Bio: Brandon is a second-year PhD student in Comparative Literature. His research interests include most branches of literary theory, multilingualism, and the indigenous language literatures of Latin America. He obtained his BA in International Literary and Visual Studies and in Child Development at Tufts University, and frequently tutored ESL. As a graduate student, he has received the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship. His favorite punctuation mark is the backslash, because when else has a punctuation mark opened a closed class like conjunctions slash become a pronounceable word in its own right question mark?

Drew

Department: Comparative Literature
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Non-Academic Writing, Legal Writing, Professional Writing, Application Documents, Critical Race Theory, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Cultural Studies, Humanities & Arts, Oral Presentations, Article Manuscript, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Grammar/Mechanics, Style/Flow, Creative Writing, Narrative Writing, Master’s Thesis, English Language Learners
Bio: Drew is a second-year PhD student in Comparative Literature. His research focuses on philosophy, critical theory, and literary & film theory. He received his BA in Philosophy and English from UCLA in 2009 before going on to obtain his MA in Humanities (with an emphasis in Continental Philosophy) from the University of Chicago in 2011. Before returning to UCLA, he acquired his JD from the University of California Hastings College of the Law, where he worked as a tutor and a Senior Supervising Editor for UC Hasting’s Constitutional Law Quarterly. His favorite punctuation mark is the § (‘section sign’) because of the §ylistic §ophistication it lends to the organization of one’s writing.

 

Gerald

Department: Psychology
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, Application Documents, Social Sciences, Fellowships/Grants, Quantitative Methods, Statistical Reporting, Statistics, Cultural Studies, Writing Process, Revision, Style/Flow, Master’s Thesis
Bio: Gerald is a fourth-year Ph.D. student in Social Psychology at UCLA. Broadly, his research examines the role of culture and identity in education. He graduated from Stanford University with a B.A. in Psychology and a minor in African & African-American Studies. Afterwards, he spent two years learning about industrial supplies at a supply chain operations firm before returning to UCLA to spend more time learning about people. Gerald is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (NSF-GRFP). He loves to paint, hang out with friends, and exercise every once in a while. He feels that the em dash is unappreciated and underutilized—you just googled “em dash,” didn’t you?

 

Hannah 

Department: Anthropology
Writing Specialties:  Academic Writing, Professional Writing, Humanities, Social Sciences, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Article Manuscripts, Oral Presentations, Public Speaking, Qualitative Methods, Cultural Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, English Language Learners, Master’s Thesis  
Bio: Hannah is a sixth year PhD student in the department of anthropology, specializing in linguistic and sociocultural anthropology. Her dissertation project examines the relationship between multilingual communicative practices and rural development work in the Himalayan foothills of Himachal Pradesh, India. Hannah earned her MPhil in Social Anthropology from the University of Cambridge and her BA in Anthropology and Linguistics from New York University. In her capacity as a fellowship consultant for the GWC, Hannah is particularly able to assist students in the humanities and social sciences in crafting proposals for research grants. Hannah has been a recipient of several extramural fellowships, including: a Fulbright-IIE US Student Program Grant, Social Science Research Council International Dissertation Research Fellowship, Wenner-Gren Foundation Dissertation Fieldwork Grant, Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad fellowship (awarded/declined), and a U.S. Department of State Critical Languages Scholarship (Punjabi). Hannah has also received several awards from UCLA, including the Charles E. and Sue K. Young Graduate Student Award for the Social Sciences (2017), a UCLA Affiliates Scholarship, and a UCLA International Institute Fieldwork Fellowship (awarded/declined). Earlier in her career, she received a Fulbright-Nehru English Teaching Assistantship and a Bill and Melinda Gates Cambridge Scholarship. Hannah has been the benefactor of much wisdom from her mentors and peers at UCLA regarding how to write successful fellowship proposals, and is keen to pass along that wisdom to her peers. Her favorite punctuation mark is the em-dash. 

Jaime

Department: Bioengineering
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, STEM Manuscripts/Presentations, Style/Flow, Fellowships/Grants, Lab Reports
Bio: Jaime is a third-year doctoral student in the Department of Bioengineering at UCLA. His research concentrates on applying computational methods from the areas of signal processing, machine learning and soft matter physics to different aspects of bacteria biofilm communities and antimicrobial peptides. He earned a B.S. in Bioengineering from UCLA in 2015. At the graduate level, Jaime has been the recipient of the Eugene V. Cota-Robles Fellowship, the Ford Pre-Doctoral Fellowship, the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and the University of California Presidential Fellowship. When once in a blue moon there is free time, Jaime enjoys painting and drawing; some of his illustrations have been featured in research journals. His favorite punctuation mark is the parenthesis (or is it?).

Janine

Department: Chemistry & Biochemistry
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, STEM, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Lab Reports, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Style/Flow
Bio: Janine is a third-year PhD candidate in Biochemistry. Her research interests focus on mass spectrometry and proteomics, more specifically microbial proteomics and understanding the role of protein acylation in metabolic regulation. Prior to graduate school, she earned a B.S. in Biochemistry from UCLA in 2017. Janine is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and the Cellular and Molecular Biology Training Grant. Outside of graduate school, Janine enjoys playing the cello and baking. Her favorite punctuation mark is the semi-colon. 

Jeanette

Department: History
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Application Documents, Humanities, Oral Presentations, Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Style/Flow, Master’s Thesis
Bio:
Jeanette is a graduate student in the History department specializing in the Atlantic World. Her research interests focus on African Diasporic resistance and popular movements in the Americas. After earning her BA in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Scripps College, Jeanette has worked as a solidarity activist and journalist across the region for almost a decade accompanying African and Indigenous led grassroots struggles. During her time in Venezuela, she pursued graduate studies at the Bolivarian University of Venezuela (UBV) in Caracas and worked with the Cátedra Libre África, a research center focused on Afro-Venezuelan history and the country’s relationship to Africa and the Caribbean. One of her favorite punctuation marks is the em dash.

Jesslyn

Department: English
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Humanities, Humanities & Arts, Arts, Application Documents, Article Manuscripts, Oral Presentations, Public Speaking, Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Grammar/Mechanics, Style/ flow, Creative Writing, Narrative Writing
Bio: Jesslyn is a 2nd year Ph.D. student in English. She studies poetics, with a split focus on Romanticism and 21st-century texts. Her research interests include the relationship between computer science and literary form (not digital humanities but algorithmic logic, abstraction, statistics, and data). Her recent projects have engaged works by William Blake, Anna Moschovakis, Douglas Kearney, Morgan Parker, and P.B. Shelley. She earned her B.A. from UC Berkeley in English and Computer Science. Her favorite punctuation mark is the em-dash, especially when it’s used to unsettle a poem's formal conceits.

Karen 

Department: Neuroscience 
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Application Documents, STEM, Fellowships/Grants, Article Manuscripts, Oral Presentations, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies
Bio: Karen is a fourth-year PhD student in the Neuroscience department; her research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms underlying multisensory processing in Drosophila melanogaster. Many of her days involve gluing fruit flies to sticks to observe their flight behavior. Karen earned a B.S. in Neuroscience and B.A. in International Development Studies from UCLA in 2013. As a graduate student, she has received an honorable mention from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Outside of lab, Karen enjoys these activities, in no particular order: playing board games, running and cycling, and playing video games to improve her reaction time. Her favorite punctuation is the colon.  

Lika

Department: Comparative Literature
Writing Specialties: Academic writing, Non-academic writing, Application Documents, Humanities & Arts, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory, Oral presentations, Writing Process, Editing Strategies, Style/Flow, Grammar/mechanics.  
Bio: Lika is a PhD student in comparative literature. Her research interests include representations of gender and sexuality and space/environment in 20th century and contemporary literature and film, French and Francophone literatures, and notions of space, confinement and movement within French and English-language contexts. Most recently she has written about Albert Camus, space, and gender; national allegory and metonymy; and 20th century re-imaginings of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Lika holds B.A. degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in English and French literature and an M.A. in comparative literature from UCLA. In addition to research and teaching, Lika copyedits for an independent press that publishes work on politics, art, and philosophy and volunteers with small nonprofits on their grant writing efforts. Prior to grad. school she worked as a writer in a behavioral psychology lab, in academic administration and in continuing education. Her favorite punctuation = the (   ) and the …

Macrina

Department: Psychology
Writing Specialties: 
Academic Writing, Social Sciences, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Article Manuscripts, Master's Thesis, Quantitative Methods, Statistical Reporting, Professional Writing, Creative Writing, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Grammar/Mechanics, Style/Flow
Bio: Macrina is a third-year graduate student in UCLA's Social Psychology doctoral program. After earning her BA in Cognitive Science from Yale University in 2012, she worked for two years as a science editor at The Huffington Post. At UCLA, her research involves borrowing tools from cognitive neuroscience to investigate complex social phenomena, including attitude change, impression formation, and conflict resolution. Macrina is a recipient of the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) fellowship. She loves coffee, hiking, and singing; also, her spirit animal is most certainly the owl. She believes the comma, which allows one to do things like breathe, organize one's thoughts, and reflect, is an underappreciated punctuation mark.

Marilyn

Bio: Marilyn Gray is the director of the UCLA Graduate Writing Center. She has a PhD in Slavic Languages and Literatures from UCLA. Her dissertation examines Mikhail Bakhtin’s thought and narrative theory from the perspective of Russian theological anthropology. After completing her BA in Slavic Languages and Literatures at Stanford University, she lived and worked in Moscow for four years. During her graduate work at UCLA, she worked for the Center for Digital Humanities assisting faculty with instructional technology and taught Russian language and English composition. She is a big fan of the em-dash and semi-colon when used judiciously.

Michelle

Department: Psychology
Writing Specialties:
Academic Writing, Application Documents, Social Sciences, Fellowships/Grants, Oral Presentations, Quantitative Methods, Statistics, Statistical Reporting, Style/Flow, Grammar/Mechanics, English Language Learners, Master's Thesis
Bio: Michelle is a fourth-year Ph.D. student in Developmental Psychology. After earning a BA in Psychology and an MA in French from the University of Notre Dame, she spent a year in France teaching English to students at the University of Rennes 2. At UCLA, her research examines factors that affect children's word and category learning. Michelle is a recipient of UCLA's Eugene V. Cota-Robles Fellowship, Graduate Summer Research Mentorship, and Graduate Research Mentorship. She has also received honorable mentions from the Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship and various travel awards. Her favorite punctuation marks are the parentheses (which allow her to give a little extra information). 

Rob

Department: Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences
Writing Specialties: Academic Writing, STEM, Fellowships/Grants, Application Documents, Writing Process, Revision Strategies, Editing Strategies, Grammar/Mechanics, Lab Reports
Bio: Rob is a second-year Geochemistry PhD student in the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences. His research revolves around understanding biomineralization, which is how organisms make their shells or skeletons. More specifically, at UCLA, he studies how the different ways organisms make their skeletons affects how they record chemical signals that inform us about past climate conditions. Rob earned BS's in Chemistry and in Geosciences from Virginia Tech in 2017. As a graduate student, he is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow and a Center for Diverse Leadership in Science Fellow. Outside the lab, Rob is a science communicator and an advocate for diversity & inclusion in STEM. He regularly makes SciComm posts on social media; is an editor for the blog Climate Currents; and is the founder & president of the organization Queers in STEM, an organization with the goal of empowering LGBTQ+-identifying students and faculty in STEM fields. His favorite punctuation is the semi-colon.